Protevi, John. Intro to Political Affect

Protevi, John. Political Affect. Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press, 2009. To remember: ['political physiology':] the imbrications of the social and the somatic: how our bodies, minds, and social settings are intricately and intimately linked ... indicate[s] not only this mix of intellectual resources [science, philosophy, and politics] but also in order to indicate that subjectivity … Continue reading Protevi, John. Intro to Political Affect

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Park, Ondine, Tonya K. Davidson, and Rob Shields. “Introduction.” Ecologies of Affect: placing nostalgia, desire, and hope

Park, Ondine, Tonya K. Davidson, and Rob Shields. "Introduction." Ecologies of Affect: placing nostalgia, desire, and hope. Waterloo, Ontario, Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2011. To remember: ironically kitsch names like "The Branding Place" or "The Shangri-La" ... speak to ambivalent desires for imagined other times (when ranching was supposedly the mainstay) and places (in this case, … Continue reading Park, Ondine, Tonya K. Davidson, and Rob Shields. “Introduction.” Ecologies of Affect: placing nostalgia, desire, and hope

Damasio, Antonio. “Stepping into the Light”

Damasio, Antonio. The Feeling of What Happens: Body and Emotion in the Making of Consciousness. New York, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 1999. To remember: Whether individually experienced or observed, pathos is a by-product of consciousness and so is desire (4). At its simplest and most basic level, consciousness lets us recognize an irresistible urge to stay … Continue reading Damasio, Antonio. “Stepping into the Light”

Henry Louis Gates. “From the Signifying Monkey and the Language of Signifyin(g)”

[pooled notes with Meghan Phelps and Geneva Korytkowski] To remember: My movement, then, is from hermeneutics to rhetoric and semantics, only to return to hermeneutics once again (1551). If orientation prevails over madness, we soon realize that only the signifier [and not the sound] has been doubled and (re)doubled, a signifier in this instance that … Continue reading Henry Louis Gates. “From the Signifying Monkey and the Language of Signifyin(g)”