Egan, Kieran. “Ironic Understanding and Somatic Understanding”

Egan, Kieran. The Educated Mind: How Cognitive Tools Shape our Understanding, University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1998. To remember: irony involves more than a perverse disguise of what might be better stated literally (137). It leads to a discussion of the kind of understanding that results from the breakdown or decay of general schemes ... … Continue reading Egan, Kieran. “Ironic Understanding and Somatic Understanding”

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Mazzarella, William. “Affect: What is it Good for?”

Mazzarella, William. "Affect: What is it Good for?" Enchantments of Modernity: Empire, Nation, Globalization, edited by Saurabh Dube, London, Routledge, 2009, pp. 291-309. To remember: Even in its relatively untheorized invocations, affect carries tactile, sensuous, and perhaps also involuntary connotations (291). I write in the belief that only those ideas that compel our desire as … Continue reading Mazzarella, William. “Affect: What is it Good for?”

Kølvraa, Christoffer. “Affect, Provocation, and Far Right Rhetoric”

Kølvraa, Christoffer. "Affect, Provocation, and Far Right Rhetoric." Affective Methodologies: Developing Cultural Research Strategies for the Study of Affect. Ed. Britta Timm Knudsen and Carsten Stage. New York: Palgrave Macmillian, 2015. 183-200. Print. To remember: Deleuzian understanding of rhetoric as a force or kind of intensity to be thought separate from processes of signification or … Continue reading Kølvraa, Christoffer. “Affect, Provocation, and Far Right Rhetoric”

Nelson, Julie D. An Unnecessary Divorce

Nelson, Julie. "An Unnecessary Divorce: Integrating the Study of Affect and Emotion in New Media." Composition Forum, vol. 34, 2016. Accessed 30 Aug. 2016. Abstract: Rhetoric and composition scholars’ almost exclusive reliance on Brian Massumi’s definition of affect has spurred a theoretical and practical divorce between “affect” and “emotion” in our field. This article returns … Continue reading Nelson, Julie D. An Unnecessary Divorce

Gibbs, Anna. “After Affect”

Gibbs, Anna. "After Affect: Sympathy, Synchrony, and Mimetic Communication." The Affect Theory Reader. Ed. Melissa Gregg and Gregory J. Seigworth. Durham & London: Duke University Press, 2010. 186-205. Print. Moments to remember: "mimetic communication [:] ... the corporeally based forms of imitation, both voluntary and involuntary ... involv[ing] the visceral level of affect contagion ... … Continue reading Gibbs, Anna. “After Affect”