Back, Les. “Live sociology: social research and its futures.”

Back, Les. "Live sociology: social research and its futures." Live Methods, edited by Les Black and Nirmal Puwar, Malden, Blackwell Publishing, 2012, pp. 18-39. Abstract: The article draws on recent debates about empirical sociology's methodological crisis that results from the emergence of sophisticated information-based capitalism and digital culture. Researchers face the challenge of "newly coordinated … Continue reading Back, Les. “Live sociology: social research and its futures.”

Advertisements

Barthes, Roland. Camera Lucida: Reflections on Photography. [Part II]

Barthes, Roland. Camera Lucida: Reflections on Photography. New York, Hill and Wang, 2010. Summary: In the second part of Camera Lucida, Barthes's reflection centers on his mother's absence/presence [in photographs] as a means to get to the noeme [essence] of photography. Through personal reflection and subjective observation, he sifts through studium to locate punctum. Furthermore, he casts … Continue reading Barthes, Roland. Camera Lucida: Reflections on Photography. [Part II]

Harry Denny. “A Queer Eye for the WPA.”

Denny, Harry. "A Queer Eye for the WPA." WPA: Writing Program Administration, vol. 37, no. 1, 2013, pp. 186-98. Accessed 5 Nov. 2016. To remember: To channel Linda Adler-Kassner in the Activist WPA, our American jeremiad is always already a paradox of an exceptionalist mission toward homogenization and assimilation that's also constantly under threat of … Continue reading Harry Denny. “A Queer Eye for the WPA.”

May, Todd. Gilles Deleuze, An Introduction

May, Todd. Gilles Deleuze An Introduction. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005. 1-17. Print. To remember: In a world that holds banality to be a virtue and originality a disease, Deleuze never stops asking the question of what other possibilities life holds open to us, or, more specifically, of how we might think about things … Continue reading May, Todd. Gilles Deleuze, An Introduction

Nelson, Julie D. An Unnecessary Divorce

Nelson, Julie. "An Unnecessary Divorce: Integrating the Study of Affect and Emotion in New Media." Composition Forum, vol. 34, 2016. Accessed 30 Aug. 2016. Abstract: Rhetoric and composition scholars’ almost exclusive reliance on Brian Massumi’s definition of affect has spurred a theoretical and practical divorce between “affect” and “emotion” in our field. This article returns … Continue reading Nelson, Julie D. An Unnecessary Divorce

Fleckenstein, Kristie. Bodysigns (part one)

Fleckenstein, Kristie S. "Bodysigns: A Biorhetoric for Change." JAC, vol. 21, no. 4, 2001., pp. 761-790. To remember: "our language and our writing should be adequate enough to make our dreams, our visions, our stories, our thinking, and our actions not just revolutionary but transformative" ("Freedom" 46) (761). Susan Jarratt notes that "both feminist inquiry … Continue reading Fleckenstein, Kristie. Bodysigns (part one)

Scott, Tony. “Writing Enacts and Creates Identities and Ideologies”

Scott, Tony. “Writing Enacts and Creates Identities and Ideologies.” Naming What We Know: Threshold Concepts of Writing Studies. Eds. Linda Adler-Kassner and Elizabeth Wardle. Logan: Utah State UP, 2015. Print. Scott casts writing as "ideological enactment," highlighting the social implications of the practice. He points to the burden of writing educators to remain cognizant of assumptions and their pedagogical impact. … Continue reading Scott, Tony. “Writing Enacts and Creates Identities and Ideologies”