Nietzche. On Truth and Lies in a Nonmoral Sense

Nietzche, Friedrich. "On Truth and Lies in a Nonmoral Sense." The Rhetorical Tradition: Readings from Classical Times to the Present, edited by Patricia Bizzell and Bruce Herzberg, Boston & New York, Bedford/St. Martin's, 2001, pp. 1171-79. To remember: language is rhetoric (1169). The pride connected with knowing and sensing lies like a blinding fog over … Continue reading Nietzche. On Truth and Lies in a Nonmoral Sense

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Cixous, Hélène. “The Laugh of the Medusa.”

Cixous, Hélène. "The Laugh of the Medusa." The Rhetorical Tradition: Readings from Classical Times to the Present, edited by Patricia Bizzell and Bruce Herzberg, Boston & New York, Bedford/St. Martin's, 2001, pp. 1520-36. To remember: about women's writing: about what it will do (1524). I refuse to strengthen [the effects of the past] by repeating … Continue reading Cixous, Hélène. “The Laugh of the Medusa.”

enthymeme and aristotle

Instead of examining everything, rhetorical argument builds, whenever possible, on assumptions the audience already holds (170). It is less rigorously tested than dialectic. Syllogism: A dialectical argument which uses logic and deductive reasoning to draw out or arrive at a conclusion based on two or more premises. Example: Major premise: All graduate students and faculty … Continue reading enthymeme and aristotle

Kølvraa, Christoffer. “Affect, Provocation, and Far Right Rhetoric”

Kølvraa, Christoffer. "Affect, Provocation, and Far Right Rhetoric." Affective Methodologies: Developing Cultural Research Strategies for the Study of Affect. Ed. Britta Timm Knudsen and Carsten Stage. New York: Palgrave Macmillian, 2015. 183-200. Print. To remember: Deleuzian understanding of rhetoric as a force or kind of intensity to be thought separate from processes of signification or … Continue reading Kølvraa, Christoffer. “Affect, Provocation, and Far Right Rhetoric”

Gorgias. “Encomium of Helen”

Gorgias. "Encomium of Helen." The Rhetorical Tradition: Readings from Classical Times to the Present. Ed. Patricia Bizzell and Bruce Herzberg. 2nd ed. Boston & New York: Bedford/St. Martin's, 2001. 42-46. Print. Intro to Gorgias (480-380 BCE): best known of sophists born in Leontini in Sicily (considered by many to be birthplace of formal study of … Continue reading Gorgias. “Encomium of Helen”